Recycling Facts

Be Green

Fact 1

When we recycle glass, we save 25 percent of the energy necessary to make glass with virgin materials.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 2

For every bottle we recycle, we save enough energy to light a 100 watt light bulb for 4 hours or the equivalent in energy of 10 gallons of oil.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 3

Glass can last for thousands of years.  It does not decompose.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 4

For every ton of plastic recycled, we save 76 million BTUs of energy.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 5

It takes 1,050 milk jugs to make one 6-foot plastic lumbar park bench.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation

Fact 6

It takes 5 soda bottles to make the fiberfill for one ski jacket.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 7

Plastic bottles can take over 1,000 years to decompose.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation

Fact 8

It takes more energy to make a new product like a can or bottle from virgin materials than it does to make a product by recycling
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 9

Recycling saves energy, natural resources, money, time, landfill space, makes less pollution, including less greenhouse gasses, and creates jobs!
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 10

When we recycle steel, we use 40 percent less water than is used to make virgin steel. In addition, we reduce air pollution by 86 percent and water pollution by 76 percent.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation

Fact 11

For every can we recycle, we save enough energy to run a 60 watt light bulb for 26 hours.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 12

For every ton of steel we recycle, we save 2,500 pounds of iron ore, 1,000 pounds of coal, and 40 pounds of limestone.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 13

It takes steel cans up to 100 years to decompose.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 14

For every ton of paper we recycle, we save:
463 gallons of oil, 7,000 gallons of water, 3 cubic yards of landfill space, 4,100 kilowatt hours of energy, and a number of trees, and we reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 850 pounds per year.—NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 15

For every ton of paper we recycle, we produce 60 pounds less of air pollution.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 16

It takes paper up to one year to decompose.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 17

When we recycle aluminum, we reduce energy use by 90 percent, air pollution by 95 percent and save enough energy recycling just one can to run a TV for three hours.—NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 18

For every ton of aluminum we recycle, we reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 13 tons, saving 237 BTUs of energy.—NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 19

It takes aluminum cans 200-500 years to decompose.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Fact 20

We generate 4.6 pounds of trash per person per day on average in the United States, the most in the world.
Wikipedia “Recycling Facts and Figures” 01/2012

Fact 21

The Energy Information Administration claims a 40% reduction in energy when paper is recycled versus paper made with unrecycled pulp, while the Bureau of International Recycling (BIR) claims a 64% reduction.
Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012

Fact 22

About 35% of municipal solid waste (before recycling) by weight is paper and paper products.—Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012  

Fact 23

Paper products are the largest component of municipal solid waste, making up more than 40% of the composition of landfills.
—Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012  

Fact 24

In 2006, a record 53.4% of the paper used in the US (or 53.5 million tons) was recovered for recycling. This is up from a 1990 recovery rate of 33.5%. The US paper industry has set a goal to recover 55 percent of all the paper used in the US by 2012.
—Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012  

Fact 25

Paper packaging recovery, specific to paper products used by the packaging industry, was responsible for about 77% of packaging materials recycled with more than 24 million pounds recovered in 2005.
—Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012

Fact 26

By 1998, some 9,000 curbside programs and 12,000 recyclable drop-off centers had sprouted up across the US for recycles collection. As of 1999, 480 materials recovery facilities had been established to process the collected materials.
—Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012

More Interesting Recycling Facts

When we recycle glass, we save 25 percent of the energy necessary to make glass with virgin materials.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

When we reycle one ton of glass, we save these naturally occurring minerals:

Reducing carbon dioxide emissions by 3.46 tons.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

For every bottle we recycle, we save enough energy to light a 100 watt light bulb for 4 hours or the equivalent in energy of 10 gallons of oil.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Glass can last for thousands of years.  It does not decompose.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

For every ton of plastic recycled, we save 76 million BTUs of energy.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

It takes 1,050 milk jugs to make one 6-foot plastic lumbar park bench.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation

It takes 5 soda bottles to make the fiberfill for one ski jacket.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Plastic bottles can take over 1,000 years to decompose.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation

It takes more energy to make a new product like a can or bottle from virgin materials than it does to make a product by recycling
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

Recycling saves energy, natural resources, money, time, landfill space, makes less pollution, including less greenhouse gasses, and creates jobs!
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

When we recycle steel, we use 40 percent less water than is used to make virgin steel. In addition, we reduce air pollution by 86 percent and water pollution by 76 percent.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation

For every can we recycle, we save enough energy to run a 60 watt light bulb for 26 hours.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

For every ton of steel we recycle, we save 2,500 pounds of iron ore, 1,000 pounds of coal, and 40 pounds of limestone.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

It takes steel cans up to 100 years to decompose.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

For every ton of paper we recycle, we save:
463 gallons of oil, 7,000 gallons of water, 3 cubic yards of landfill space, 4,100 kilowatt hours of energy, and a number of trees, and we reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 850 pounds per year.—NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

For every ton of paper we recycle, we produce 60 pounds less of air pollution.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

It takes paper up to one year to decompose.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

When we recycle aluminum, we reduce energy use by 90 percent, air pollution by 95 percent and save enough energy recycling just one can to run a TV for three hours.—NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

For every ton of aluminum we recycle, we reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 13 tons, saving 237 BTUs of energy.—NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

It takes aluminum cans 200-500 years to decompose.
NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation (2011 website)

We generate 4.6 pounds of trash per person per day on average in the United States, the most in the world.
Wikipedia “Recycling Facts and Figures” 01/2012

The Energy Information Administration claims a 40% reduction in energy when paper is recycled versus paper made with unrecycled pulp, while the Bureau of International Recycling (BIR) claims a 64% reduction.
Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012

About 35% of municipal solid waste (before recycling) by weight is paper and paper products.—Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012  

Recycling has long been practiced in the United States. The history of paper recycling has several dates of importance:

Paper products are the largest component of municipal solid waste, making up more than 40% of the composition of landfills.
—Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012  

In 2006, a record 53.4% of the paper used in the US (or 53.5 million tons) was recovered for recycling. This is up from a 1990 recovery rate of 33.5%. The US paper industry has set a goal to recover 55 percent of all the paper used in the US by 2012.
—Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012  

Paper packaging recovery, specific to paper products used by the packaging industry, was responsible for about 77% of packaging materials recycled with more than 24 million pounds recovered in 2005.
—Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012

By 1998, some 9,000 curbside programs and 12,000 recyclable drop-off centers had sprouted up across the US for recycles collection. As of 1999, 480 materials recovery facilities had been established to process the collected materials.
—W
ikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012

In 2008, the global financial crisis resulted in the price of old newspapers to drop in the US from $130 to $40 per short ton ($140/t to $45/t) in October.
Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012

Today, 90% of paper pulp is made of wood. Paper production accounts for about 35% of felled trees,[4] and represents 1.2% of the world's total economic output.
—Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012

Recycling one ton of newsprint saves about 1 ton of wood while recycling 1 ton of printing or copier paper saves slightly more than 2 tons of wood.
—Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012  

Relating tons of paper recycled to the number of trees not cut is meaningless, since tree size varies tremendously and is the major factor in how much paper can be made from how many trees.
—Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 01/2012

Most pulp mill operators practice reforestation to ensure a continuing supply of trees.[citation needed] The Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) and the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certify paper made from trees harvested according to guidelines meant to ensure good forestry practices. It has been estimated that recycling half the world’s paper would avoid the harvesting of 20 million acres (81,000 km²) of forestland.
Wikipedia “Paper Recycling” 2012 (website)

The United States throws away enough iron and steel to continuously supply all the nations’ automakers.
Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 (website)

Used motor oil is recycled into re-refined otor oil or fuel blended with other fuels to be burned in industrial boilers for energy.
Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 (website)

Steel cans and steel scrap are recycled into new steel products including structural steel, bolts and nuts, coat hangers, and more steel cans.
Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 report (website)

Steel recycling results in 74% savings in energy, 90% savings in virgin materials, 86% reuction in air pollution, 40% reduction in water use, 76% reduction in water pollution and 97% reduction in mining wastes.
Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 report (website)

The average household throws away two pounds of steel per week which if recycled would save enough energy to keep a 60 watt bulf burning for two days.
Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 report (website)

Over 35% of the polyester carpet made and sold in the United States contains PET plastic.  It takes 35 PET plastic bottles to make one square yard of polyester carpet.
Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 report (website)

Plastic containers are recycled into plastic lumber for picnic tables and park benches, carpet fiber, clothing, automotive parts, paint brushes, and more plastic bottles.
Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 report (website)

Enough plastic bottles are thrown away each year in the United States to circle the earth four times.—Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 report (website)

Approximately 88% of the energy is saved by producing plastic from plastic as opposed to plastic from the raw materials of oil and gas.
Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 report (website)

Newsprint are recycled into newspapers, paper egg cartons, cereal bosed, cellulose insulation and acoustical ceiling tiles.
Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 report (website)

Refillable glass bottles use 19,000 BTUs of energy as compared to 38,000 BTUs by throwaway bottles.
Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 report (website)

About 10 million tons of newsprint is thrown away each year in the the United States.
Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 report (website)

Approximately 40% of our waste stream is recyclable.
Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 report (website)

Our garbage is made up of the following materials:  41% paper, 18% yard waste, 9% metals, 8% glass, 8% food waste, 7% plastic, and 9% other.
Mississippi Dept of Environmental Quality 2007 report (website)

Recycling is a continuous loop that works only if the collected materials are turned into products, bought and used again.  Buying products made from recydled materials supports the markets for these products and keeps the cycle going.
Washington State Dept of Ecology 2011 report (website)

Around 200 B.C. Chinese used old fishing nets to make the world’s very first piece of recycled paper.
Washington State Dept of Ecology 2011 report (website)

Gary Dean Anderson designed the recycling symbol in 1970.
Washington State Dept of Ecology 2011 report (website)

The first municipal dump was established in 400 B.C. in ancient Athens.
Washington State Dept of Ecology 2011 report (website)

Recycling, where instituted, creates many more jobs for rural and urban communities than landfill and incineration disposal options.
Washington State Dept of Ecology 2011 report (website)